Electromagnetic radiation

Electromagnetic radiation:- Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that includes radio waves, microwaves, X-rays, and gamma rays. It can be observed as visible light but can also be detected in other forms such as infrared or ultraviolet. Electromagnetic radiation appears to travel at the speed of light; however, it is actually quite different from the massless particles known as photons which make up light.

Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that includes radio waves, microwaves, X-rays, and gamma rays, as well as visible light.

Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that includes radio waves, microwaves, X-rays, and gamma rays, as well as visible light.

It’s important to understand the difference between electromagnetic radiation and light. Light has one wavelength (color), while electromagnetic radiation can have many different wavelengths at once. For example, infrared (IR) has longer wavelengths than red or blue colors; ultraviolet has shorter wavelengths than red or blue colors; violet can be considered an intermediate wavelength between IR and UV because it falls in between those two extremes on our color spectrum chart.

The term “electromagnetic” refers to the movement of electric current through space—an electric charge creates an electric field; this field pushes on nearby objects—and vice versa: pushing on something creates an opposing field which repels other charges from them (like repelling magnets).

Electromagnetic radiation can be described in terms of a stream of massless particles, called photons, each traveling in a wave-like pattern at the speed of light.

Electromagnetic radiation can be described in terms of a stream of massless particles, called photons, each traveling in a wave-like pattern at the speed of light. Photons are the smallest unit of light and are sometimes referred to as elementary particles.

Photons do not interact with electric or magnetic fields and have no charge or mass; therefore they cannot be stopped by an electric field (such as that from your body) nor slowed by a magnetic field (such as one produced by magnets).

Electromagnetic radiation occurs over an extremely wide range of wavelengths, from gamma rays with wavelengths less than about 1 x 10-11 meters to radio waves measured in meters.

Electromagnetic radiation occurs over an extremely wide range of wavelengths, from gamma rays with wavelengths less than about 1 x 10-11 meters to radio waves measured in meters. The principal source of electromagnetic energy is the sun, whose spectrum includes continuous and discrete components that are identified as solar flux lines (see below).

  • Continuous spectrum: this consists of all wavelengths between 0.3 µm and 3 µm inclusive; it contains a large number of photons but few electrons or ions because they can only be excited by higher frequencies.
  • Discrete spectrum: this represents discrete energies between 0.3 µm and 2 mm inclusive with each photon given an energy level starting at 3 × 10^−9 eV (1 eV = 1 Bohr).
Sources of electromagnetic radiation are charged particles accelerated by an electric field.

The sources of electromagnetic radiation are charged particles accelerated by an electric field. An electric field is produced by a difference in electric potential between two points, and it can be measured in volts. In other words, if you have two points (e.g., positrons), then there’ll be a difference between them—and this difference represents the amount of work it takes to move a charge from one point to another. That’s why we call it “work”: because we’re using our muscles to do the moving!

So let’s say that someone has an electric field at point A and another person has an electric field at point B; then they both produce fields with opposing signs so that they cancel each other out completely—but only on average over time (so not always). This means that we don’t see any net change in either direction; instead, what happens is that all these little fluctuations add up together into something bigger overall:

Many electromagnetic waves emitted by stars and other celestial objects naturally fall within the visible spectrum.

You may have seen pictures of the night sky and thought that they were beautiful. You might have even wondered how these images were created. In fact, the visible light emitted by stars, planets, and other celestial objects naturally falls within the visible spectrum. This means that our eyes can perceive only a small part of this vast electromagnetic spectrum—which extends from infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths with wavelengths longer than that falling within our range of vision

We are surrounded by electromagnetic radiation.

Electromagnetic radiation is emitted by all objects in the universe, and the Earth is surrounded by electromagnetic radiation. The sun emits electromagnetic radiation, which causes its own electromagnetic field (the solar wind) to flow out into space. This solar wind carries with it any cosmic dust that may have landed on or around planets like ours.

The Earth also produces its own unique type of electromagnetic field, called geomagnetic activity or magnetism. This field constantly changes due to interactions with incoming cosmic rays and other types of particles—but we can measure some aspects of this changing magnetic field through instruments such as barometers and compass needles that detect changes in air pressure or direction based on their orientation relative to certain points above ground level where they’re placed during construction projects like building foundations for homes built near power lines etcetera…

CONCLUSION

Electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy that includes radio waves, microwaves, X-rays, and gamma rays. It can be described in terms of a stream of massless particles, called photons, each traveling in a wave-like pattern at the speed of light. Sources of electromagnetic radiation are charged particles accelerated by an electric field. Many electromagnetic waves emitted by stars and other celestial objects naturally fall within the visible spectrum

READ MORE:-The rotation of the Earth

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